The 12 Steps to Holiness and Salvation (UltraSoft)

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The 12 steps to holiness and salvation  ultrasoft  2629

Item details

Condition
Brand New
ISBN
9781618909220
Publication Year
2016
Language
English
Country/Region of Manufacture
United States
Topic
Holiness and Salvation
Format
Premium UltraSoft
Author
St. Alphonsus Liguori
MPN
9781618909220

More about this item

The 12 Steps to Holiness and Salvation (UltraSoft)
by St. Alphonsus Liguori

The 12 virtues we must all acquire to be happy in this world and to save our souls is now available in beautiful, Premium UltraSoft, featuring a ribbon marker and gilded edges. The 12 Steps to Holiness and Salvation is compiled from the writings of St. Alphonsus Liguori and is considered one of the classic works of spirituality. St. Alphonsus reviews the 12 key virtues: Love, Hope, Love of God, Love of Neighbor, Poverty, Chastity, Obedience, Meekness, or Humility, Morti?cation, Recollection, Prayer, and Love of the Cross.
                        
About the Author:  
St.
Alphonsus Liguori was born in 1696 to Neapolitan nobility at Marianella, Italy. He became a recognizable lawyer after going through law school at the age of sixteen but later decided to leave law in favor of giving his salvation more attention. Alphonsus joined the Oratory of St. Philip Neri as a seminarian and was ordained in 1726 when he was thirty. The homilies he gave had the special ability to convert those who had fallen away from the faith. He also founded the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer, and authored such works as The Glories of Mary, The True Spouse of Jesus Christ, Attaining Salvation, The Blessed Virgin Mary, Preparation for Death Abridged, What Will Hell Be Like?, The Twelve Steps to Holiness and Salvation, and The Way of the Cross.

After being a bishop for over a decade, St. Alphonsus Liguori died on the first of August, 1787. He was canonized by Pope Gregory XVI in 1839 and declared a Doctor of the Church in 1871. His feast is celebrated on August 1. 

Product Details:  
Item No: 2629
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9781618909220
Publisher: Saint Benedict Press, LLC.
Imprint: TAN Books
Publication Date: October 2016
Binding: Premium UltraSoft
Dimensions: 4.5 x 6.25

Excerpts from this Book:

"The heart cannot exist without love; it will love either God or creatures. If it does not love creatures, it certainly will love God. In order to become holy, we must, therefore, banish from our hearts all that is not for God. When anyone came to the Fathers of the desert and desired to be received by them he was asked: 'Do you bring an empty heart that it may be filled by the Holy Ghost?' And they were right, for a heart that is filled with the things of the earth has no room for the love of God. He who brings a vessel filled with earth to the spring will never be able to fill it with water until he empties it of the earth with which it is filled. How does it happen that so many pray and go frequently to Holy Communion and still make no considerable progress in the love of God? The reason is doubtless that the heart is full of self-esteem, of vanity, of self-will, and of attachment to creatures. He, therefore, who wishes to arrive at the perfect love of God must practice poverty in spirit. He must be detached from worldly possessions, from temporal honors, from his fellow-creatures, and from himself."
— St. Alphonsus Liguori, p. 114-5

"Although our Divine Redeemer was the Lord and Master of all the riches of Heaven and earth, He willed nevertheless to become poor in this world that through His example we might become rich. He wished to induce us to love poverty as He did, for poverty, by detaching us from earthly riches, enables us to share in the treasures of Heaven. ... [It is] the teaching of our Blessed Lord that the poor in spirit shall have a great and certain reward. Their reward is certain, for when our Savior enumerated the Beatitudes in the Gospel, He referred in most instances to the future ... but to the poor in spirit, He promises happiness even in this life: 'Blessed are the poor in spirit for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.' (Matt. 5:3). While here on earth, they receive special graces. The reward of the poor in spirit is, secondly, very great. 'The less we have here,' says St. Teresa, 'the greater will be our joy in Heaven, where our dwelling shall correspond to the love with which we imitated the life of poverty of our Divine Master here on earth'. The truly poor in spirit enjoy a heavenly peace even here in this world. ... [He] who is poor from choice despises the possessions of this earth and is at the same time the master of all."
— St. Alphonsus Liguori, p. 122

 "A hidden and obscure life affords great security to those who sincerely desire to love God. Our Divine Master Himself deigned to teach us this by His own example, for He spent thirty years in the obscurity of Nazareth and the workshop of a humble carpenter. In imitation of their Divine Model, many saints withdrew into the desert and lived in remote caves to escape the esteem of men. The desire to put ourselves forward and merit the plaudits of men, to be regarded as very successful in our undertakings, is, according to St. Vincent de Paul, and evil that causes us to forget our God; it vitiates our holiest actions and more than anything else impedes our progress in the spiritual life. To be pleasing and acceptable in the sight of God, we must, therefore, banish from our hearts the desire to appear before men to win their approval and applause and especially the desire to rule over others."
— St. Alphonsus Liguori, p. 128-9

"With regard to evil thoughts, there may be a twofold delusion. God-fearing souls who have little or no gift of discernment, and are inclined to scruples, think that every wicked thought that enters their mind is a sin. This is a mistake, for it is not the wicked thoughts in themselves that are sins, but the yielding or consenting to them. The wickedness of mortal sin consists in the perverse will that deliberately yields to sin with complete knowledge of its wickedness with full consent. And therefore St. Augustine teaches that when the consent of the will is absent, there is no sin. However much we may be tormented by temptations, the rebellion of the senses, or the inordinate motions of the inferior part of the soul, as long as there is no consent, there is no sin. For the comfort of such anxious souls, let me suggest a good rule of conduct that is taught by all masters in the spiritual life. If a person who fears God and hates sin doubts whether or not he has consented to an evil thought or not, he is not bound to confess it, because it is morally certain that he has not given consent. For had he actually committed a mortal sin, he would have no doubt about it, as mortal sin is such a monster in the eyes of one who fears God that its entrance into the heart could not take place without its being known. Others, on the contrary, whose conscience is lax and not well-informed, think that evil thoughts and desires, though consented to, are not sins provided they are not followed by sinful actions. This error is worse than the one mentioned above. What we may not do, we may not desire. Therefore an evil thought or desire to which we consent comprises in itself all the wickedness of an evil deed."
— St. Alphonsus Liguori, p. 142-3