Trustful Surrender to Divine Providence: The Secret of Peace and Happiness

$13.95
Quantity:
Add to cart
Payment options
PayPal
Shipping options
Estimated to arrive by Thu, Apr 29th

This estimate is based on:

  • The seller's handling time
  • Economy shipping (1 to 10 business days) transit time to US

Actual delivery times may vary. Have shipping questions? Contact the seller

FREE via Economy shipping (1 to 10 business days) to United States
Qty available
12 in stock
Return policy
Returns Not Accepted
Trustful surrender to divine providence the secret of peace and happiness

Item details

Condition
Brand New
ISBN
9780895552167
Format
Paperback
Publication Year
2009
Language
English
Country/Region of Manufacture
United States
MPN
9780895552167
Author
  • Rev. Fr. Jean Baptiste Saint-Jure, S.J. and St. Claude de la Colombiere, S.J.
Topic
Secret of Peace and Happiness

More about this item

Trustful Surrender to Divine Providence:
The Secret of Peace and Happiness
by 

Rev. Fr. Jean Baptiste Saint-Jure, S.J.
and St. Claude de la Colombiere, S.J.

Trustful Surrender to Divine Providence: The Secret of Peace and Happiness   To trust in God’s will is the “secret of happiness and content,” the one sure-fire way to attain serenity in this world and salvation in the next. Trustful Surrender simply and clearly answers questions that many Christians have regarding God’s will, the existence of evil, and the practice of trustful surrenders, such as
• How can God will or allow evil? (pg. 11)  
• Why does God allow bad things to happen to innocent people? (pg. 23)  
• Why does God appear not to answer our prayers? (pg. 107)  
• What is Trustful Surrender to Divine Providence? (pg. 85)  
• and many more…
This enriching classic will lay to rest many doubts and fears, and open the door to peace and acceptance of God’s will. TAN’s pocket-sized edition helps you to carry it wherever you go, to constantly remind yourself that God is guarding you, and He does not send you any joy too great to bear or any trial too difficult to overcome. "To remain indifferent to good fortune or to adversity by accepting it all from the hand of God without questioning, not to ask for things to be done as we would like them but as God wishes, to make the intention of all our prayers that God's will should be perfectly accomplished in ourselves and in all creatures is to find the secret of happiness and content."  

About the Author:
Trustful Surrender to Divine Providence: The Secret of Peace and Happiness was written by Father Jean Baptiste Saint-Jure, S.J., and St. Claude de la Colombiere, S.J. This particular volume was culled from Father Saint-Jure's great work entitled The Knowledge and Love of Our Lord Jesus Christ, to which was added a further extract from St. de la Colombiere's writings. It was originally published in 1961 by Alba House and subsequently reissued by St. Raphael Editions in 1978, 1980, and (in cooperation with TAN) 1983. It received the Nihil Obstat and Imprimatur upon release.  

Product Details:
Item No: 0982
Pages: 144
ISBN: 9780895552167
Publisher: Saint Benedict Press, LLC
Imprint: TAN Books  
Publication Year: 2009
Binding: Paperbound
Dimensions: 4" X 6" X 0.25"

Excerpts from this Book:
Avoid worrying, then, about anything else for your children except whatever may contribute to bringing them up virtuously. For the rest, having entrusted them to God, try to see what His will for them is, to help them along the path in life He has chosen for them. Never be afraid of relying too much on Him, but rather seek always to increase your trust more and more, for this is the most pleasing homage you can pay Him and it will be the measure of the graces you will receive. Little or much will be given you according as you have expected little or much."
— St. Claude De La Columbiere, p.46

"Moreover we learn from the principles of our Faith and the teaching of the Saints that often God Himself by His immediate action withdraws the visible effects of His grace for purposes in accordance with His wisdom and goodness. How many persons who have become lukewarm and careless in their duties are roused by the awareness of God's absence and are able to regain the fervor they had lost! How many more have been led to the practice of the highest virtue by interior trials! Who can measure the degree of heroic virtue saints like St. Ignatius, St. Teresa or St. Francis de Sales attained by this means? We must consider it the action of a Providence unceasingly attentive to the welfare of His children, who feigns to abandon them in order to rouse them from slumber or increase their humility, self-distrust, and self-renouncement, their confidence in God, submission to His will and perseverance in prayer. Hence instead of allowing ourselves to become discouraged and fainthearted under trials which may seem to overwhelm us, let us act in the same way as we do when our bodies are sick, consult a good doctor—a good spiritual director—and applying the remedies he advises, patiently await the effects that it pleases God to give. Everything is meant for our good, and such trials ought to be counted as special graces from God. Whether or not they are sent as a punishment for our sins, they come from Him and we should thank Him for them, placing ourselves entirely in His hands. If we bear them with patience we shall receive greater grace than if we were filled with a sense of fervent devotion."
— Jean Baptiste Saint-Jure, p. 74

"Finally—and this is perhaps the most difficult aspect of what concerns the practice of conformity to the will of God—we should desire virtue itself and the degrees of grace only insofar as God wishes to give them, and not desire more. Our whole ambition should be to attain the degree of perfection that has been appointed for us since it has not been given to everybody to reach the same height. It is obvious that however well we may correspond with the graces given us, we can never equal the humility, charity and other virtues of the Blessed Virgin. And who can even presume to imagine that he can reach the same heights as the Apostles? Who can equal St. John the Baptist whom Christ called the greatest of the children of men? Or St. Joseph to whom God entrusted His Son? In this, we must as in all else submit to the will of God. He must be able to say of us, My will is in them; it rules and governs everything. So when we hear or read that God in a short time has brought some souls to a very high degree of perfection and shown them signal favors, enlightened their understanding and imbued their hearts with His love, we should repress any desire to be treated likewise so as not to fall short in pure love of conformity to His Will. We should even unite ourselves still more closely to His Will by saying, 'I praise Thee, O Lord, and bless Thee for deigning to show Thyself with so great love and familiarity to the souls
Thou has chosen ...'"
—Jean Baptiste Saint-Jure, p. 75-76

"We trust ourselves to a doctor because we suppose he knows his business. He orders an operation which involves cutting away parts of our body and we accept it. We are grateful to him and pay him a large fee because we judge he would not act as he does unless the remedy were necessary, and we must rely on his skill. Yet we are unwilling to treat God in the same way! It looks as if we do not trust His wisdom and are afraid He cannot do His job properly. We allow ourselves to be operated on by a man who may easily make a mistake—a mistake which may cost us our life—and protest when God sets to work on us. If we could see all He sees we would unhesitatingly wish all He wishes."
— Fr. Jean Baptiste Saint-Jure, p. 90

"Moreover, beseech daily the eternal Father, His divine Son, and the Blessed Virgin, that you may be particularly under the protection of St. Joseph, the worthy spouse of the most chaste of virgins. Then addressing yourself to this loving protector, ask with great humility to be received into his care. For innumerable are the instances of assistance afforded to those who have called upon St. Joseph in their spiritual or temporal necessities. Particularly has he aided them when they stood in need of light from heaven, and direction in their prayers. And if God shows so much regard for the other saints who have loved and served Him here below, how much consideration and deference will He not show for the person He so honored as to pay him filial homage and obedience?"
— Dom Lorenzo Scupoli, p. 154